A longitudinal investigation of childhood communication ability and adolescent psychotic experiences in a community sample

TitleA longitudinal investigation of childhood communication ability and adolescent psychotic experiences in a community sample
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsSullivan, SA, Hollen, L, Wren, Y, Thompson, AD, Lewis, G, Zammit, S
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume173
Issue1-2
Date PublishedJan-05-2016
Abstract
Background: Some childhood speech and language impairments precede psychosis but it is not clear whether
they also precede adolescent psychotic experiences and whether this association is specific to psychotic experiences.
Methods: Pragmatic language and expressive speech and language (parent-assessed using the Children's Communication
Checklist) at age 9 and psychotic experiences and depression at ages 12 and 18 were investigated
in 7659 participants from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Associations were investigated
using multivariate modelling.
Results: Poorer pragmatic language at 9 years was associated with psychotic experiences at both ages (12 years
OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.11, 1.34; 18 years OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.10, 1.41) but only with depression at 18 years (OR 1.10,
95% CI 1.00, 1.22). Poorer expressive speech and language ability was not associated with psychotic experiences
or depression at either age. There was evidence that pragmatic language was specifically associated with psychotic
experiences at age 12 but no evidence that the strength of any of the associations changed over time.
Conclusions: Deficits in pragmatic language precede early and late adolescent psychotic experiences and early adolescent
depression. Interventions aimed at helping children improve pragmatic language skills may reduce the
incidence of adolescent psychopathology and associated psychological disorder and dysfunction later in life.
 
ISSN Number09209964
Keywordslongitudinal
URLhttp://www.schres-journal.com/article/S0920-9964(16)30100-1/abstract#pageBody
DOI10.1016/j.schres.2016.03.005
Short TitleSchizophrenia Research